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Jokes on evolution

ilovecharts:

Evolution
via Kurt White

Jokes on evolution

ilovecharts:

Evolution

via Kurt White

Photoset

pants are key. 4 am and everyone around me is asleep while 300 is on, so this is the last upload for me. 

putthison:

How Pants Should Fit

It’s much easier to get trousers to fit well than jackets. There’s also less wiggle room for interpretation. While there are different schools of thought on how a jacket should fit, trousers should only fit one way. There shouldn’t be any puckering or pulling along the seat, waist, fronts, or back, and there shouldn’t be any ripples along the legs. Instead, there should be a completely uninterrupted line going from the top to the bottom, both along the front and back of the trousers. If there is a break, the maximum number is one, and if there are pleats, they should remain closed at all times. Regardless of their style (slim, tapered, straight legged, full, etc), these points should remain true for any classic pair of men’s trousers. 

Though it’s easier to find well fitting pants, that doesn’t mean it’s always accomplished. Most men’s trousers suffer from any number of problems. Above is a color photograph that shows how a pair of well fitting pants should look. Below that are a number of black and white diagrams posted by Tutee on StyleForum, each of which demonstrate some common defects. If you click on the diagrams, they’ll expand and you’ll see that they’re lettered.

  • Fig A. Roping Along Seat Seam: Here there’s tightness in the seat seam, which is drawn tautly up the center. Vertical folds thus appear. 
  • Fig B. Diagonal Creases from Fork to Side Seam: This is more often than not something you see on corpulent or semi-corpulent figures. The defect unfortunately emphasizes the contour of the wearer’s stomach, which is of course the last thing a stout gentleman would want.
  • Fig C. Vertical Folds at the Fork: The fork is the area of your body that joins your legs to the trunk. Here, folds of excessive material are seen around the fork, and they run towards the inside of the leg. 
  • Fig D. Excess Material in the Lap: This was made into a pretty funny scene on Curb Your Enthusiasm. Obviously, there will always be a certain amount of excess material in the lap when the wearer is seated. This is what allows your pants to fit well when you’re standing up. However, if there is too much material, it should be considered a defect (note: I’ve found zippered flys to be worse offenders than buttons in these cases). 
  • Fig E. “Horseshoe” Folds: Perhaps the most common defect is when excessive material folds near the fork, around the seat of the pants. There may also be diagonal drags running down the inside of the leg. 
  • Fig. F. Fullness Under the Seat: Similar to Figure E, there can also be excessive material under the ball of the seat. This material can sag away from the wearer.
  • Fig. G. Drags from Fork to Knee: Here, when the wearer is seated, creases extend from the knees back towards the fork (again, where the leg joins the trunk of your body). There is also a slight pull from the knee bone to the back of the leg. 
  • Fig H. Horizontal Creases at the Fork: This can occur either in the front or the back. Tutee notes that this is also common in old trousers, especially ones that haven’t been pressed or re-shaped occasionally. 

A number of things that can cause these defects. The seat angle might be too low or high; there could be insufficient or too much room in the trunk or fork; the leg seams can be too open or closed; or the legs can be placed incorrectly from the fork. 

There are remedies, but many of them involve details that are only of interest to tailors and those who commission bespoke clothing. For most people, whether some of these are fixable through an alterations tailor depends on what exactly is causing the problem. For example, if there is fullness in the seat, there could be just excess material. In this case, if it’s not too much material, a tailor can most likely take it in. If it’s a result of an incorrect seat-angle, however, this will be much more difficult. 

So what can you take away?

  • Well first, you should use the color photograph above as a model for how trousers should fit. Perhaps you like them skinnier or fuller, or you like to wear belts instead of braces. Either way, you can see here what it means to have “clean lines.” 
  • Second, keep the diagrams in mind so you know what to look for when trying on pants. As with almost all off-the-rack clothing, it’s nearly impossible to get something to fit 100% perfectly, so expect that there will be issues. You just want to minimize the defects. 
  • Third, if a pair of trousers doesn’t fit, your best bet is to try on either the size above or below, and see if the problems aren’t remedied. Notice here that almost all the problems occur between the waist and the thigh. Buy pants that fit you best in these areas. Most of the time, you’ll be able to alter the waistband and calves. If the trousers still don’t fit after you change sizes, that specific cut simply doesn’t fit you, so move on. 

And that’s how pants should fit. 

* This post owes itself to Tutee, who has been a remarkable contributor on every major classic mens’ style community. 

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another sick denim shirt with sick az design. next your going to be seeing errone wearing theze

howtotalktogirlsatparties:

Denim & Supply gave their trucker jacket the sherpa treatment.

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suits are sick, but balance so important…

putthison:

How a Suit Jacket or Sport Coat Should Fit

A couple of weeks ago, I said that there are different schools of thought on how a jacket should fit, but trousers should only fit one way. Upon reflection, I now realize that was a bit misleading. There’s a difference between style and fit. Generally speaking, style is about silhouette, whereas fit is about whether something sit on you correctly. Simon Crompton has a good article about this difference. 

There are different silhouettes for jackets, but the rules we have for how they should fit are similar to those we have for trousers. There shouldn’t be any pulls or puckers along the front or back, the sleeves should be free of any ripples when the arms are naturally hanging down, and the jacket should have clean lines all around. These principles should be true regardless of the jacket’s style (e.g. clean, draped, padded, natural, skinny, full). 

Unlike trousers, however, suit jackets and sport coats are much harder to fit well. Their construction is more complicated, so there are more things that can go wrong. Above is a set of photographs I’ve stolen from Macaroni Tomato and slightly modified. Each photo illustrates a common defect. Click on each of the photographs, and you’ll see that they’re lettered.

  • Fig. A. Sleevehead and Collar: The most difficult areas to fit well are perhaps the shoulders and collar. A properly fitting jacket shouldn’t have any indentations in the sleeveheads and it should stay glued to your neck at all times. 
  • Fig. B. Strained Buttoning Point: Here tightness at the buttoning point can result in a jacket pulling around the waist, effectively forming an “X.” To be sure, this is sometimes purposefully done in the name of fashion, but more often than not, it’s a sign that a jacket is too tight. (Note that the jacket pictured here doesn’t have problems in this area). 
  • Fig C. Messy Back: Likewise, the back can have unsightly folds or pulling along the waist, around the shoulder blades, and underneath the collar. A well fitting jacket should have none of these issues, but rather fit cleanly.
  • Fig. D. Sleeve Pitch: If the sleeve isn’t attached to the jacket at a degree that harmonizes with the wearer’s natural stance, you may see furrows along the sleeve. You can see an example of this here
  • Fig. E. Flared Vents: A properly fitting jacket should always have closed vents, like the ones in this picture. Make sure yours don’t flare out or gape. 
  • Fig. F. Balance: The term “balance” can refer to a few things on a jacket, but in this case, we’re talking about the relationship between the front and back of the jacket, as well as left and right sides. There are two schools of thought on how the front and back should balance. Most tailors believe that the front should be slightly longer than the back, but a few think they should evenly align. Here, the jacket’s front is even with the back. Another aspect of balance concerns the left and right sides. Here there is less controversy; these two parts should always be dead even with each other along the hem. If you wish to read more about this issue, check out this article by Michael Anton.

Like we saw for trousers, there can be a number of causes for these defects. Depending on the cause and how your jacket is constructed, an alterationist tailor may or may not be able to fix the problems for you (at least within a reasonable cost). The easiest to fix are Figures B and C. Indeed, those are rather common to clean up, so unless you see severe problems in those areas, you needn’t worry about them. The rest you should probably make sure fits right off the peg. 

To read more about fit, you can check out my posts on trousers and silhouettes, as well as Jesse’s posts on jackets, collar gaps, an unfortunate Pitti Uomo attendee, and Conan O’Brien. This simple guide by Esquire and Ethan Desu’s comments are also worth reviewing. 

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Don’t usually do them varsity jackets, but this one got a nice look.

parkandbond:

The varsity jacket took a west coast sabbatical…

Don’t usually do them varsity jackets, but this one got a nice look.

parkandbond:

The varsity jacket took a west coast sabbatical…

(Source: giltman)

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had this idea awhile ago…iphone sleeve wallet. earthing in one

anchordivision:

ANCHOR DIVISION: Hauskrft - Leather iPhone Sleeve Wallet 

had this idea awhile ago…iphone sleeve wallet. earthing in one

anchordivision:

ANCHOR DIVISION: Hauskrft - Leather iPhone Sleeve Wallet 

(via whiskeygrade)

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Old skol peat coat…

adventures-of-the-blackgang:

- Antarctic Attitude -
Crew member W. F. Howard on board RRS Discoverycaption: “at Adeli (sic) Land Dec 28th 1931”
set: British Australian & New Zealand Antarctic Research Expedition 1930-1931(53 photos)

Old skol peat coat…

adventures-of-the-blackgang:

- Antarctic Attitude -

Crew member W. F. Howard on board RRS Discovery

caption: “at Adeli (sic) Land Dec 28th 1931

set:
British Australian & New Zealand Antarctic Research Expedition 1930-1931
(53 photos)

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Keep pushing that new old school

Keep pushing that new old school

(Source: thepursuitaesthetic, via ilovemensfashion)

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iseecloudsinmycoffee:

Garage Door.

Some of that ethnic style

iseecloudsinmycoffee:

Garage Door.

Some of that ethnic style

(via ilovemensfashion)

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Sick multi colored jumper

Sick multi colored jumper

(via ilovemensfashion)